Wednesday, October 17, 2012

Why I'm excited for next week's debate

From last night's debate, a terrific moment of real, personal emotion from Obama.  It's a sneak peek at the monumental task Romney has before him in the foreign policy debate next week.  Obama has an indisputable record of foreign policy accomplishments (killing bin Laden, deposing Qaddafi for a thousandth of what we spent in dollars and American lives to depose Saddam), and Romney is pretty much proposing a return to Bush-era foreign policy.  As previously discussed, Obama has plenty of material to work with.

4 comments:

NWest said...

Obama's Foreign Policy has been nothing but a continuation of Bush-era foreign policy! Has Gitmo been closed? Have we *stopped* intervening overseas?

What debate will there be? "Who will work harder to make more enemies overseas?"

US foreign policy works best when it's about keeping the sea lanes safe and following Jefferson's precept: "I am for free commerce with all nations, political connection with none, and little or no diplomatic establishment. And I am not for linking ourselves by new treaties with the quarrels of Europe, entering that field of slaughter to preserve their balance, or joining in the confederacy of Kings to war against the principles of liberty."

alex N said...

Interesting you chose Jefferson. He specifically projected U.S. force into Libya, even putting boots on the ground over there. The marines sing about it today, "to the shores of Tripoli"

NWest said...
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NWest said...

Alex N, the Arab pirates were attacking American shipping and we chose not to pay tribute. How is this the same, at all, as invading a country because the people are fighting to be "liberated"?

I'm not against projecting american force when force is used against us, or a country declares war on us. Did you not read my comment - I specifically included "keeping the sea lanes safe".

The problem lies in trying to change the behavior, via war, of cultures that have not evolved to the point where representative democracy can work without devolving into theocracy or dictatorship.